Blog Archives

Building a Business Model with Andrew Light from Sapient Nitro

Andrew Light gives a list of tips for any new venture to keep in mind when developing a new business plan. When creating a business plan, it is important to know exactly what you are trying to achieve. Typically, businesses lack focus or become too ambitious so rather than attempting to do everything yourself and be all things to all people, the best course of action is to focus on the niche you want to target and determine if it’s big enough to sustain your venture.

Identify Your Value Proposition

Before you can understand your own business, you need to understand the market. Who are the other ‘players’, and what are they doing? Once you’ve plotted where other players are, you have a better chance of understanding what your focus should be in order to compete effectively. This might be as simple as knowing what you don’t want to do.

Once you have an idea of what the market looks like, you can decide how to position yourself. How will your business fit into the competitive landscape? What do you want your business’s market segment to be – value? Quality? What are your ‘core values,’ and how will they match your business model? In general, the further from the ‘centre’ of the market you are and the more defined your plan is, the better your value proposition is likely to be.

In any case, the fundamental aspects of a good value proposition are that it is measurable (how do you know how big your market is?), sizable (is it big enough?), applicable (can you reach the market in a cost-effective way?), and desirable (for instance: is the market ‘durable’? In other words, will it last long enough to make your business worth it?).

Design Adaptive Products and Services

Simply designing a product may not be enough. The landscape of the market may change, and your product may need to change with it. Thus, you will need to know how to build what are termed ‘active offerings’ – adaptive consumer products that can change with the market’s needs.

Plan Your Budget

The most important part of your budget is your ‘peak funding requirement’ – that is, your moment of maximum exposure. Investors will need to know just how big your – and their – risk is.

Understand How to Attract Investors

Investors will want to know who you are, what your idea is, what your business model is, and who your customers are. People are actually the most important thing: investors are looking for more than just an idea or a product – they want to work with people who are honest, experienced, have leadership qualities, and have passion for what they are doing. Most investors will know that ideas can be refined, but personal conflicts or lack of expertise are more difficult to remedy. On the other hand, many good ideas never become successful businesses. Don’t assume that your product alone will be enough to sell your business. It also pays to understand your market and what you are trying to achieve. Show that there is a market by giving the examples of other applicable business plans – and how yours is different. Likewise, before you meet with investors, you should have a clear pricing strategy (competitive? Predatory? Bundled?) and understand how big the market is and how big (realistically) your share might be. Get your facts and figures right, and don’t exaggerate.

Andrew also gives a few short tips in conclusion:

– Have a tightly defined value proposition.

– Emphasise you.

– A great product on its own is no recipe for success.

– Ontario is a great place to be right now. There is a compelling story around digital, mobile, and Ontario.

Videos:

Forming a Business Plan

Different Business Models

Attracting Investors

Pricing

 

Ontario Media Development Corporation        MEIC-square-logourl

Advertisements

Working with Mobile Carriers presented by Renee Szuhai of Telus.

When starting to build your app, there is the issue of which platform should be used. If you decide your app is more suitable to be distributed by a carrier rather than an app store, Renee Szuhai notes that there are some important things to consider. While working with carriers is a viable option, there are also manypotential challenges, and developers should be clear about and what they hope to achieve before they begin negotiations.

For example: Who is the target audience? How will billing be arranged? What platforms are being targeted, and how will integration be organised? Contract negotiation is another issue: Will the app be geared toward particular carriers or regions? How widely will the app be distributed; is it proprietary, national, or global? Then there is Over-The-Air (OTA) functionality and Application Programming Interface (API) support to consider.

Fortunately, the Global System Mobile Association (GSMA) has launched its ‘OneAPI’ pilot programme in Canada. OneAPI is an agreed standard for Network APIs among different mobile networks. Since OneAPI does the work of negotiating with carriers, developers can use it to make their apps available nationally to all carrier customers in a single step.

The GSMA website LINK explains

OneAPI in this way:

The OneAPI Exchange is an infrastructure that provides developers with access to mobile network operator assets via APIs. This infrastructure federates different operators into one unit providing a wider reach for developers.

As a developer you will set up a relationship with one mobile network operator. This operator will expose RESTful APIs to you. Once you have implemented these APIs and published your app, the API calls are federated through the OneAPI Exchange backend infrastructure to all of the other participating operators. This allows you to increase your reach to all subscribers of the other operators.

Negotiating with individual carriers can be a difficult experience, as Renee notes. Rogers is the only Canadian carrier that currently has a developer programme, and using this might limit an app’s distribution to Rogers’ customers. On the other hand, for all but the largest developers it can be very difficult to attract the attention of other carriers such as Bell and Telus. Renee likens the experience to ‘swimming through peanut butter,’ noting that even finding the right person to contact can be a trial, after which negotiations can drag on for months. Then there are the issues of arranging integration for billing, messaging, location, payment, and so on. The whole process, Renee notes, can be a bit of a headache.

For app developers, working with carriers is an option, but one that comes with its own issues and challenges.

Video: Working with Carriers

 

Ontario Media Development Corporation    MEIC-square-logo    images

Event: Accessibility and AODA – Implications and Opportunities for Software, Website and Mobile Application Design.

Accessibility and AODA – Implications and Opportunities for Software, Website and Mobile Application Design.

Organisations in Ontario need to become fully compliant with the new AODA legislation, if not they will be vulnerable to large fines. Experts tell us that there are even greater rewards for inclusive design and AODA compliance in the form of better products and services, and improved marketing opportunities.

Conestoga College has organised a talk to give their students a strong introduction to these issues, and have brought together talented speakers to discuss design and accessibility.

For organisations and employees, this is an excellent opportunity to be introduced and gain greater insights into software design for AODA legislation and accessibility.

Speaker line-up:

Speaker #1 – Wayne Pau, Development Architect, Emerging Technologies – Customer Engagements & Special Projects SAP

Speaker #2 – Janna Cameron, Sr. Usability Specialist, Team Lead, Desire2Learn Incorporated

Speaker #3 – Andreas Kyriacou, Systems Integration and Innovation Coordinator, IMS Conestoga College Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning

In addition:

Speaker #4 – Manny Elawar, BlackBerry Developer Evangelist

Manny will speak on the promotion of the BlackBerry Jam space at the Communitech Hub as a resource for all mobile developers to gain expertise and insight into development.

Date: Thursday, March 27, 2014

Time:

1:00pm – 3:00pm Presentations

3:00pm – 4:00pm Networking 

Location: Room 1E05, E-Wing, IT school, Doon campus

http://www.conestogac.on.ca/campuses/doon/

Site map:

http://www.conestogac.on.ca/campuses/doon/siteplan.jsp

 

Testing with Wayne Pau of SAP

Wayne makes a key point about testing: “it’s not just about finding bugs in the software, but to really making it better.”

Wayne presents testing as a series of “zero sum games.” Budgets and deadlines mean you can’t test everything, so it’s important to decide the kinds of testing that are going to be the most effective. In other words, testing itself needs to be optimised. It should get the most ‘bang for your buck’ and help to actually fix bugs, rather than just collect them.

Top 4 Recommendations for Testing

Since not everything can be tested or fixed, Wayne introduces a few scientific approaches to help pare down testing to make it more manageable. Wayne’s recommendations for testing include the following:

1. Have a Plan: When you decide to test, it’s important to have a plan. Organize your limited resources, and schedule your testing to be effective as possible. It’s a good idea the spend time identifying ‘high-yielding’ tests and prioritizing ‘high-yield’ areas of code or features before setting up testing environments and thinking about test coverage.

2. Variety is Essential: Don’t always use the same data. Use different types of tests to compensate for each test’s weaknesses.

3. Knowledge is Power: Learn from other testers’ experience and pay attention to what is happening in the development practices, then ask questions, read the bug reports, and see what is breaking for others, so you don’t repeat the same mistakes.

4. Be Results-Oriented: Create priorities about what needs to be tested and work on the goal of choosing quality over quantity when testing. Avoid default test data, target critical bugs in main features, reduce and eliminate redundant tests, and generate ONLY quality bug cases.

Continuous Integration

Continuous Integration is just what it sounds like: a development process in which team members’ work is integrated continuously. Integration happens multiple times per day, and is tested with an automated build to find errors whenever they crop up. Wayne believes that continuous integration is a key aspect of modern agile development practices, since constant iteration requires constant testing to make sure each version holds together.

Wayne uses the analogy of Lego blocks: When building, you want to make sure that the individual blocks and the way they are connected work, and not wait until later to see if your construction falls apart. Under older integration processes, developers might spend as much time trying to integrate the unwieldy pieces of their creations as building them. Continuous integration is about avoiding that problem by identifying and squashing bugs as soon as they occur. By reducing the risk of unpleasant surprises later in development, it also allows you to get a good idea of the quality of your code and what kind of progress you are making.

Wayne sounds a note of caution: Automated testing will not identify all bugs, log issues, or help to debug software. Think of it as a part of a developer’s repertoire, rather than a replacement.

The Pitfalls of testing

Wayne outlines three pitfalls of testing: Human Bias, Group Think, and Inference and Assumptions.

Human Bias: We all have biases due to our backgrounds, and these may influence our decisions. While transcending bias is easier said than done, we all benefit from becoming aware of our bias and how it might affect our testing and objectivity. If you are aware of your bias, you might be able to make choices you otherwise wouldn’t have.

Group Think: Teams have their own biases as well. If everyone is just agreeing with each other, we might be creating ‘yes teams,’ instead of creating teams that test assumptions.

Inference and Assumptions: There is an additional pitfall: Obvious patterns can fool us into jumping to erroneous conclusions. Indicators are not results: They just indicate those areas where we should test for results. For any testing, past experience should be only used as a guide and not as a conclusion.

UPDATE since Wayne’s presentation at MEIC!

Since Wayne’s presentation on testing at MEIC, Steve Krugh has been recently acknowledged Wayne in a new chapter on mobile in his 3rd edition of “Don’t Make Me Think,” a very popular and must have book on UX. Steve Krug is one the leading authorities in research in human-computer interaction and web usability. Wayne highly recommends Steve’s book for everyone who builds mobile apps to buy this book.

Steve’s website: http://www.sensible.com/

Video 1: Introduction to testing

Video 2: Mathematics of Testing

Video 3: Continuous Integration

Video 4: Pitfalls of Testing

Ontario Media Development Corporation         MEIC-square-logo SAP_Logo

Market Research for Mobile with Krista Napier of IDC Canada

In this two-part presentation with Krista Napier from IDC Canada, Krista shares key information about when and how to conducting mobile market research. Her tips include how to focus a company’s market research to guide future mobile product development. For example, to validate a concept, market research data can be used to determine if there is a demand for the product.

Krista lists the following four reasons to conduct market research:

  • Opportunity to make money
  • Market Readiness
  • Geographic Differences
  • Positioning

Is there an opportunity in the market to make money? Searching for opportunities means looking for gaps in the market where customers’ needs or wants are not being met. Your mobile services and products may meet those customer demands, and the customers will be willing to pay for your solutions.

Making sure that there is market readiness for your mobile product. There might be an app you want to build, but the customers were not yet ready to accept. If the market is not equipped to use the technology, then wait for a better time to build it.

Your market research can look at geographic differences. Your mobile product will not suite everyone, so your market research will give you the ability to create a niche within your target market.

Market research can also provide insights to positioning; i.e., how you must position your mobile service relative to other competitors in the market. If there are many competitors in your market or not that many, it might be a question of large or minimal amount of demand.

Krista’s Research Tips

Krista offers two main tips to help with conducting market research: 1) the importance of the quality and quantity of your metrics and 2) the location they came from.

A very important part of market research is to be aware of the quality of the source of the data. Not only the number of respondents, but the quality. The quality of respondents has a strong impact on research results. They need to come from a diverse pool that answered without bias, again with the end goal of having accurate data. Respondents who have already used your app will be biased and should not be used. There needs to be an ample amount of respondents to create an accurate result.

Finally, customers’ data from Canada should not be used to for American market research and vice versa. Being in Canada, it’s better not to assume that US trends can be used cross-geographically. There are different dynamics of vendors and adoption patterns in the US compared to Canada. Using trends from one country for another will skew your strategy for your mobile apps.

Video 1: Market Research Part 1

Video 2: Market Research Part 2

Screen Shot 2014-02-10 at 1.48.22 PM        MEIC-square-logo            Ontario Media Development Corporation

%d bloggers like this: